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Paranormal Saints Uk

Paranormal Saints Uk

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Paranormal Saints Uk
Good morning everyone, hope you all have a fabtastic day, stay safe, stay warm, stay spooky 👻 #ghosts #paranormal #Halloween #ghost #haunted #spooky #horror #scary #spirits #creepy #ghoststories #paranormalactivity #ghosthunting #paranormalinvestigation #supernatural #haunting #ghostbusters #hauntedhouse #ghosthunters #spirit #art #GhostAdventures #hauntedplaces #ghosthunter #podcast #spookyseason #paranormalinvestigator #demons #october #horrormovies #followers @followers ... See MoreSee Less
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Ghost Hunt – East Drive30 East Drive is infamous for being home to Europe’s most violent poltergeist. This property has seen many people leave in terror. As this is deemed one of the most haunted houses in Britain, it has many similarities to the infamous Enfield Haunting. The film, ‘When the Lights Went Out’ was made based purely on the terrifying story of the Pritchard family that lived in this house and there has been numerous newspaper reports that can be accessed on social media. It has also been widely investigated by many paranormal teams such as Most Haunted and Paranormal Lockdown high have documented its malevolent activity.It is believed that this property is haunted by a malevolent poltergeist known as ‘The Black Monk of Pontefract’ (also affectionately known as ‘Fred’). Despite attempts to bless this house there are still paranormal teams reporting objects being thrown or moving infront of their eyes, dark shadows lurking, doors opening and strange sounds are heard when no one is around.HistoryThe Story of 30 East Drive as taken from the 30 East Drive Website…Jean, Joe, Phillip (15) and Diane (12) Pritchard moved into Number 30 East Drive, Pontefract in August 1966. Almost immediately, during the hot summer Bank Holiday, Phillip and his Grandmother first witnessed a baffling phenomenon – a fine layer of chalk like dust falling not from the ceiling, but from a level below head height.In an effort to clean up before Phillip’s holidaying parents returned, Mrs Kelly (Phillip’s Aunt who had been fetched by her mother to observe the falling dust) went to the kitchen for some cleaning implements, whereupon she slipped on a pool of water that had mysteriously appeared. Her efforts to mop up the water were thwarted by more pools appearing on the linoleum in front of her and Phillip’s very eyes.This was the beginning of several years of incredible, inexplicable events; green foam appearing from taps and toilet even after the water was turned off, the tea dispenser being activated resulting in all the dried tea cascading onto the work surface, lights being turned off and on, plants leaping out of their pots and landing on the stairs, cupboards shaking violently, photographs being slashed with a sharp knife and an endless list of levitating and thrown objects – including a solid oak sideboard.Dubbed ‘Mr Nobody’ by the local press in 1968, the family preferred to refer to the poltergeist simply as ‘Fred’, perhaps as a way of normalising ‘It’ as no number of initiatives could persuade the entity to leave the family in peace and house-proud mother Jean refused to be terrorised out of her house by an entity. Exorcisms were met with indignation; walls would seep holy water, faces were slapped, people were shoved down the stairs and ‘Fred’s’ hands would appear from nowhere and conduct the Christian songs aimed at shooing him off – whilst wearing huge women’s fur gloves. In fact, many of Fred’s antics were both amazing and often highly amusing, like when he calmly poured an entire jug of milk he removed from the fridge over a skeptical aunt, leaving the kids in stitches.Ordinarily poltergeists aren’t known for causing grievous bodily harm, and although Fred caused a few bruises and scrapes and lot of heart stopping scares, in particular to Diane – seemingly the focus of the haunting – it is rare for a poltergeist to become excessively violent and cause physical harm. But in the case of Fred, that indeed became the case. Late on in his residency, when both Phillip and Diane were beginning to exit adolescence, the activity reached a new climactic height with Diane’s long hair suddenly standing on its end, followed by her being dragged kicking and screaming up the stairs, an event that left her seriously traumatised and with clearly visible finger marks on her throat.WARNING – Only for the brave!What to Expect from a night with Kindred Spirit InvestigationsOur professional team will lead you through a night of investigation using traditional and up to date techniques of investigation using a range of tools / equipment to evidence the paranormal.We have intimate groups that promote more intense paranormal activity and allow you to experience a wider range of phenomenon.A wide range of the latest equipment and gadgets for your use throughout the night as seen on all the leading programs. Our experienced team will explain how the equipment works, what it measures and then its up to you to try it out! ... See MoreSee Less
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Good morning everyone, have a lovely day.284 Green Street, EnfieldPhotographer reveals theory behind infamous Enfield haunting ‘floating child’ picturewhat has become one of the most defining British ghost stories of the last century, the seemingly remarkable events at a council house in north London has inspired films, stage plays and endless conspiracy theories.During the 1970s, a family became the subject of national attention after a series of terrifying incidents at their home at 284 Green Street, Enfield.Dubbed the Enfield Poltergeist, images showed a young girl levitating while a recording was taken of a raspy voice claiming to be the ghost of a man who had previously died at the property.Speaking to The Independent, a Daily Mirror photographer who visited the house regularly between 1977 and 1979 has recalled his involvement with the Hodgson family, and his own theory behind the events at the property.Graham Morris had been in his early twenties and had been working the night shift when the first call came into the newsroom. “The next door neighbour to the family called and said ‘Can you help us, we don’t know what to do about it, spooky things are happening next door. The family are beside themselvesIt was only half an hour later after the neighbour mentioned that police officers had attended that Mr Morris and a reporter were dispatched to investigate.After arriving at midnight in August 1977, he and his colleague were taken to the kitchen while Penny Hodgson and her children were brought into the room.“Suddenly all these things started flying around the room, it was really unnerving. I got struck above my eyebrow with a lego brick with some force,” he said. “The kids were just in such a state, screaming and crying, it was horrible looking at the pictures.“I was looking out for it, there was no way any of them were doing it,” he said. “I was watching everybody through my camera and no one was doing that, they couldn’t have just flicked it with the force that propelled itself across the room.“They would have had to swivel around and thrown it over their head, it definitely wasn’t them.”After his pictures were published, Mr Morris spent the next 18 months visiting the property and photographing the strange goings on.Their story soon attracted the attention of the Society for Psychical Research (SPR), including investigator Maurice Grosse who recorded many hours of audio of the alleged poltergeist.On some occasions, chairs would fall over in closed rooms while knockings could be heard on the wall. During overnight stays with members of the SPR, Mr Morris would leave his camera in the children’s bedroom with a long cable down to the kitchen while an audio recording was taken.“As soon as you heard anything in the room, I’d take a lot of pictures,” he said. “You didn’t know until the next day what you’ve got.” It was through this approach that the images of Janet Hogson, 11, supposedly levitating in the air were taken.During another incident, they overheard a crash in an upstairs bedroom and found an enormous cast-iron double bed on its side. “It was absolutely solid,” he said. “There was no way on earth that a child or even all the children on their own could have moved that bed let alone tipped it on its side. There were so many things in that house that are impossible to account for.”Speaking of their stress, he said the mother was “beside herself” while her son Billy had “serious mental issues” and another was sent to a boarding school for behavioural problems.Meanwhile, her other daughter Margaret was “so highly strung she’d cry if you spoke to her”, while the family lived in poverty.Rather than believe it was the work of a ghostly presence, Mr Morris, now aged 69, believes that the incidents were connected to Janet, who was at the “epicentre” of the supernatural behaviour.“My theory being an onlooker there was that it was coming out of Janet,” Mr Morris said. “She’d got to school and things would fly out of the classroom or she’d go to the shops and tins would come off the shelves.“That was some kind of force that we don’t get yet and maybe we won’t in my lifetime. It was some kind of kinetic energy coming out around her, it sounds daft but that’s the theory.”Several months after Mr Morris had begun attending the property, Janet began speaking in a low, gravelly voice, claiming to be Bill Wilkins, a former tenant who had died at the property.Around 18 months after first becoming involved, the peculiar incidents began to stop and Mr Morris no longer was required to visit the Hodgson family.“It was weird, it was the strangest thing. It was all true,” he said. “Absolutely everything that happened was true. They couldn’t have made it up.“This wasn’t Dreamworks or Disney, they didn’t have CGI. They were a very poor household who were frightened to death and they didn’t understand what was happening and they wanted it to stop.”Pictures of the bizarre incidents have inspired a number of adaptations, with The Enfield Haunting due to open in the West End next month.Starring Catherine Tate and David Threlfall, it is the latest dramatisation after the fringe production The Enfield Poltergeist and a forthcoming Apple TV docu-drama. The infamous ghost story also served as the inspiration behind the Hollywood horror The Conjuring 2. ... See MoreSee Less
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Hey @followers coming soon we have something new and exciting, We will be doing live podcasts with episodes and series starting just after Christmas, don’t worry if you miss a pod cast all episodes will be on Apple Music and Spotify for you to enjoy at your own leisure, also will be a video series, so stay tuned we are all set up, some interesting surprises to come, stay safe, stay spooky 👻 #podcastlaunch #likeforlikes #hauntedhouse ... See MoreSee Less
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